Roseline de Thélin has been making a name for herself with her stunning holographic light sculptures. Using a wide range of materials including fiber optics, quartz crystals, mirrors, wires and chains, she creates ethereal human beings that look like they’re mysteriously hovering in mid-air.

For this year’s Kinetica Art Fair, London’s annual event that sits at the cross section between art and science, de Thélin exhibits Seated Child, a sculpture that’s meant to represent “God’s waiting room in the spiritual dimension” or “waiting in limbo.”


Wolfgang Stiller // Matchstick Men

 ”The installation can appear like a battlefield or just like some playground where someone played around with matches and dropped them.All the heads I’ve used so far are from Chinese people. This sometimes leads to the assumption that this is a criticism of the Chinese government. One can read it that way, but I think this metaphor could be used for any western system as well. The matchboxes could be simply seen as formal elements within the installation, as coffins, or simply as matchboxes. I actually like to keep it open since I don’t like art that leaves no space for one’s own imagination.”


Brooklyn-based artist group FAILE, a collaboration between artists Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller, unveiled this permanent public installation entitled Wolf Within. Standing approximately 16.5 feet tall, the sculpture consists of fiberglass, steel, and granite, and is located at the site of the National Garden Park in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

The Wolf Within concept was originally conceived in 2008 as a series of paintings that created a strong visual dialogue about the current financial crisis. According to the artists, “For Western audiences, Wolf Within was a vivid illustration that the bull-market couldn’t last forever, and a world out of balance can only sustain itself for so long.”


 Kader Attia //Holy Land,


Entitled Submergence, the piece was developed by collaborative group Squidsoup, which consists of international artists, researchers, and designers who create work that “combines sound, physical space, and virtual worlds to produce immersive and emotive headspaces where participants can take active control of their experience.”

(x)


Martin Huberman//Tender : Clothespins 


Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.


Hiro Yamagata // Quantum Field X3 


For the recently concluded show Call of the Wild at Nashville’s Rymer Gallery, artist Herb Williams displayed some gorgeous crayon sculptures that were all inspired by nature (pictured: The Ripple Effect ). Based on the idea that nature communicates through a spectrum of colors that we cannot see, he carefully and deliberately stacked a rainbow of colored crayons for each piece.


Aude Moreau has created a carpet that is not only good enough to eat off of, but is actually edible! The sweet furnishing, aptly titled Sugar Carpet (or Tapis de Sucre), is made of over two tons of refined sugar.